Posts Tagged 'New York City'

Some Maps of How Educated America is

Here’s an interesting new interactive map to look through. The US Census Bureau has mapped the United States on a county by county basis based on education level. This is a map of every county in America sorted by high school graduation rate (a darker color indicates a higher percentage):

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.theatlantic.com/newsroom/img/posts/2013/12/Census_Explorer_HS/f901100d1.png

Here’s one for the percentage of adults with a bachelor’s degree (again, a darker color indicates a higher percentage):

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.theatlantic.com/newsroom/img/posts/2013/12/Census_Explorer_High_School/e53d48994.png

Here’s a better way to look at college graduates per county. in terms of raw numbers:

The message these maps show us is that it’s the Amtrak corridor (Washington DC, New York City, and Boston), the Great Lakes and California that really dominate the battle for the most educated areas of the country. I love it when people take raw boring statistical data and translate into something visually interesting to look at. This is just another interesting way to look at the various regions of America.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

New York City in the 1990s

New York City or really any major city in the world is in a constant state of change. Old buildings are being torn down while new ones rise up to take their place. Even more buildings are finding themselves remodeled to meet the needs of their current occupants. New business are starting up while others are shutting down. New bike sharing programs are being added to the streets while old rail lines are becoming public parks. I received a reminder about this fact of life when I saw this wonderful collection of photographs of New York City in the 1990s. I always find it somewhat remarkable seeing pictures of old businesses that no longer exist even going back to the not-too-distant past of the 1990s. Pictures like these are a good way to tell what has changed and what has stayed the same over time.


That was back when MTV actually broadcasted music.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

Renderings of the High Line’s Final Section are Released

One of the coolest new things to recently come into existence in Manhattan was the High Line. What used to be an elevated rail line in the Lower West Side hasn’t seen a train roll over it since 1980 and sat abandoned and deteriorating for almost twenty years. The line was almost completely demolished in the late 1990s until some concerned citizens convinced the City Hall that they had a better plan for it. Since 1999 there has been a lot of work done to transform the rail line into a beautiful public park for all to enjoy. The first third of the new park was opened to the public in 2009 and the second third was opened up in 2011. Construction for the final third of the High Line began last year and is scheduled to open in 2014. However, there is one big piece of recent news regarding that final section under construction. For the first time, detailed plans and renderings of the completed northern section of the High Line were released to the public and those pictures look incredible. Especially impressive was the plan for the northeastern terminus which will look like a big bowl surrounded on all sides by trees and overlooking the Hudson River and 10th Avenue. The High Line is an incredible example of our ability to transform an obsolete eyesore into a beautiful attraction and I for one can’t wait to see the finished result next year.


New York likes their trains underground now.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

New York’s Best Running Routes

Last weekend the New York City marathon returned after a one year hiatus following Hurricane Sandy. The grueling race starts in Staten Island and goes the long way around all five boroughs before finally ending in Central Park. The race goes through some of the most beautiful parts of the city with some of the best views you can find. The problem is that you can’t run much of it yourself unless you’re running in the marathon. As an average pedestrian you can’t expect major roadways to shut down for you any time you want to go for a run.

That’s where Leah Serinsky of Fathom comes in. She put together a map of some of the best running routes that you can take advantage of year-round. These areas are mostly cut off from car traffic and also feature some incredible views of the metropolis. They also a feature an extended route for those who can do it and a shorter version for people like me without the endurance of a marathoner. A common theme of these routes is that they’re all along either the Hudson or East Rivers which comes with provides some great perks to a runner. The open space of the river ensures that you always have some great scenery to look at on the other side while the large amount of open water has a moderating effect on the temperature making you run cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter compared to the rest of the city.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

What New York City Sounded Like in the 1920s

Ambient noise is almost always all around us. Right now where I’m sitting I can hear the constant hum of a very loud refrigerator and the footsteps of people walking on the floor above me. That also exists when you go outside as well. If you walk outdoors onto any street in New York City your ears will not be greeted with silence. You will hear the background noise of cars, trucks, and buses operating. You will hear the chatter of people walking on the sidewalks even though you will almost instantly forget the words that were spoken. This is all background noise, the sound that emanates from a city merely existing.

What we don’t often realize is that the ambient noise we hear when we step outside has changed dramatically over time. Hundreds of years ago New York City existed in a world without a combustion engine where the quickest and most reliable forms of land transportation were all horse-powered. What New York sounded like then we don’t exactly know because Thomas Edison hadn’t invented the phonograph yet. However, thanks to the work of historian Emily Thompson we do know what the ambient sound of New York City existing was in the 1920s. Her project has collected as many sound recordings from that era as she could from the twenties and thirties and reconstruct what the ambient soundscape likely would have been. It’s a really cool project from a time when New York City was finally starting to resemble what it is today.


Now we know what that sounds like.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

A View of New York From the Rooftops

It’s certainly no secret that Manhattan has many skyscrapers and that there are many incredibly beautiful pictures of that skyline. The thing about many of those pictures though is that they are often shot from a long distance away. In fact the best places to get a good shot of the whole skyline are on the other side of the East or Hudson Rivers. However, those pictures can get boring after a while. Many of the best pictures of the city are taken from little known places inside the city itself. That is where the work of the photographer Stewart Mader comes in. Two years ago he started a project where he takes pictures of the city from a new rooftop every week and so far he’s gotten some incredible shots. Looking through these pictures shows us that there are beautiful parts of the city we never even knew existed and provides us with a fresh, unique look at America’s largest metropolis.


Upper East Side from 66th floor, Chrysler Building.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

New York City’s Silent Restaurant

Most of us enjoy silence in the right situations. When I want to go to sleep at night I want complete darkness and silence in my bedroom. But would you go out to dinner at a restaurant that doesn’t allow you to speak?

That is what one restaurant in Brooklyn is doing. Inspired by Buddhist monks in India who eat their breakfast in complete silence, the owner of Eat in Brooklyn is having certain nights where no one in the dining room is allowed to speak ever. On these nights all diners are served the same four course meal for $40 per person so no words need to be spoken to order food. The only noises that are heard in the dining room are background noise from the street and the kitchen and the sounds of people eating.

This is an interesting little novelty and I think it is a cool idea for a restaurant to stand out in New York City’s extremely competitive restaurant market. They are also wise to impose these rules only on select nights because novelties can wear off pretty quickly. Diners at the restaurant seemed to enjoy the experience though because they knew what they were getting into.


A restaurant where no one speaks with their mouth full.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

Why People Are Giving Up Cars

We’ve been experiencing a large-scale transformation in how we get around. Once the ownership of cars became sufficiently widespread in the 1950s we’ve seen explosive growth in urban sprawl and suburbs because car ownership allowed people to live much further away from where they worked. As an example, the town of Wayne, New Jersey is now a big suburb 20-30 minutes outside New York City with a population of about 54,000 people. Between 1940 and 1960 Wayne’s population exploded from 6,868 people to 29,353 people (that’s a growth rate of 427%) and that trend has repeated itself all over the country.

Now we’re seeing evidence that that trend is reversing itself. Right now the percentage of American households that don’t own a car is at 9.3 percent which is up from 8.7 percent where it bottomed out in 2007. Forbes has a fascinating article about what the contributing factors are to this trend.

Lack of a driver’s license – Believe it or not there is much less interest in getting a driver’s license compared to a decade ago. Young people who grow up in cities where car ownership is unnecessary are less likely seek a driver’s license when they’re old enough to get one because they don’t see a need for one. However, the biggest adult demographic of people without a driver’s license are people between the ages of 30 and 55.

Access to other transportation
– Mass transit, especially around urban areas has expanded to the point where it provides a viable alternative to commuters. Commuter bus and rail lines have expanded to much more areas and have allowed young commuters to be able to put off buying a car.

Cars aren’t available – Increasing population density decreases access to cars. Around 30 percent of people who live in areas with 10,000 people or more per square mile report they do not have access to a car. The further out you get into the countryside, the more that number decreases.

It’s easier to walk places – Walkable communities are hot real estate right now and there is great demand to not have to use a car to do routine errands like grocery shopping. Living in a walkable area decreases the need to own a car and some people are able to ditch it entirely as a result. Also there has been a rise in telecommuting and working from home which further decreases the use of cars.

All of that being said, we’re still a culture very much in love with our cars. Over 90 percent of American households own at least one car and 80 percent of commuters use a car at some point in their commute. But that is changing slowly but surely.


I don’t think anyone enjoys going through that every day.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New Jersey, New York, and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

The World’s Most and Least Honest Cities

Would you return a lost wallet loaded with money and the owner’s contact information? That’s what reporters from Reader’s Digest tried to find out. In an attempt to find the most and least honest cities in the world they went to sixteen cities and deliberately misplaced some wallets. It turns out that the most honest city they tested was Helsinki, Finland where all but one of the lost wallets was returned. The least honest city tested was Lisbon, Portugal where only one wallet was returned and that one honest person was a Dutch tourist. The lone American city tested was New York City and it turned out to be more honest than most of the cities tested, returning 8 out of 12 wallets. More interesting was that age, gender, and income played no significant role in determining who would return a wallet. Here is a list of all the cities and the number of wallets that their citizens returned (out of 12):

Lisbon, Portugal: 1
Madrid, Spain: 2
Prague, Czech Republic: 3
Zurich, Switzerland: 4
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: 4
Bucharest, Romania: 4
Warsaw, Poland: 5
London, UK: 5
Ljubljana, Slovenia: 6
Berlin, Germany: 6
Amsterdam, Netherlands: 7
Moscow, Russia: 7
New York City, USA: 8
Budapest, Hungary: 8
Mumbai, India: 9
Helsinki, Finland: 11


The Finns may speak a crazy language but they won’t steal your wallet.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

French Castles Are Cheaper Than New York Apartments

It’s no secret that real estate in New York City is expensive. Most city residents have resigned themselves to the fact that if they don’t already own property in the city limits they probably never will. But what if you do earn enough to make buying a house or apartment in New York a viable option? Would it even be worth it? Buzzfeed has put together a list of six lovely picturesque castles in France that while expensive, cost less than some houses and apartments on the market in New York City. What could possibly explain why a modest living space in New York could demand a higher price than an extravagant French chateau?

It all comes down to supply and demand. New York City crams about 8.3 million people into 302.64 square miles with many more people wanting to move in. By owning property in the city you are not only close to the office where you earn your money, but you also have the ability to make a killing renting your property. Living in New York also comes with the advantages of not having to own a car and all of those related expenses as well as fairly easy access to markets for goods and services that you want and need. All of those factors are what drive property values in New York up to the astronomical levels that they’re at now.

Now lets compare that to the French castles. Yes they’re quite large, luxurious, and have incredibly beautiful views. However, Many of them are out in the French countryside further away from shops, services, and places where people work. Also maintaining those incredible lawns and gardens can’t be cheap. There is also the issue of taxes. If you earn anywhere near the amount of money where you can afford one of those castles you’re going to pay far more in taxes living in France than you will in America. When you consider all of those factors together, that is why enormous French castles are cheaper than New York real estate. The list price of a New York apartment is far closer to the true cost of ownership than it is for a French castle. But I will defiantly keep that article in mind in the incredibly unlikely chance that I win the Powerball.


I’ll take that over a Bed-Stuy townhouse any day.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York City and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.