Posts Tagged 'map'

A Map of the Rudest and Most Polite States

Some places just have nicer people than others and now we have some hard data to back that up. The data firm Marchex analyzed thousands of recorded phone calls to call centers with customers from all 50 states and recorded the frequency of callers using curse words as well as “please” and “thank you”. The results were interesting too. The states with the filthiest mouths were Ohio, Maryland, New Jersey , Louisiana, and Illinois while Washington, Massachusetts, Arizona, Texas, and Virginia had the people least likely to use profanity. As far as our pleases and thank yous go South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Louisiana, and Georgia ranked as our most polite states while Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Indiana, Tennessee, and Ohio rank as the least polite.

A few interesting notes about the profanity usage were that men were far more likely to curse than women and that a call was far more likely to contain curse words the longer the call lasted. Also New Jersey, Maryland, and Louisiana were ranked very highly in both cursing frequency and usage of the words “please” and “thank you”. As a New Jersey native, that fits me perfectly. Ohio on the other hand was ranked both as one of the least polite and most profane states in the country. However, I don’t think that is something that the great state of Ohio should be ashamed of. We have a broad language with hundreds of thousands of words all of which are appropriate for certain situations and they should be proud of using the words that they do. Besides, who among us hasn’t been tempted to curse while frustrated on a call with a call center?

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The Regions That Make Up America

The United States is an enormous country with enormous regional differences. Different parts of our country were settled and developed by different people which has led to different attitudes about most of the things that we face and that has largely defined our history. Those differences are often fleshed out in the arena of politics where there have always been regional fights about the issues of the day and those fights have even resulted in a civil war. Well for the first time Colin Woodward and Brian Stauffer of Tufts University have attempted to define the broad regions that make up America both in terms of the composition of the people that live in each region and the general attitude that those regions have about society. They split up the the US and Canada into 11 distinct regions which they call Yankeedom, New Netherlands, Midlands, Tidewater, Greater Appalachia, Deep South, El Norte, The Left Coast, The Far West, New France, and First Nation. The map and article is a great look at the regional diversity that fundamentally shapes America’s identity and I find that incredibly cool to think about.


Well that certainly explains the difference between North and South Jersey.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

A Map of America’s Personality Types

It’s no secret that regional stereotypes about people exist in America. While there is some element of truth to stereotypes of all groups of people, it is hard to really scientifically quantify that. It is difficult to determine if New Yorkers really much ruder than the rest of the country of if Californians are really more laid back and creative. Well the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology just released a study covering all that and more. The primary goal of the study was to determine exactly the amount of regional variation in personality types America has.

Generally speaking the country was split among three different personality types: friendly and conventional, relaxed and creative, and temperamental and uninhibited and they released three maps showing the frequency of each personality type appearing in each state. The results are actually kind of what you would expect with few surprises. The state of New York scores very low in the frequency of friendly and conventional, while scoring extremely high in temperamental and uninhibited. The same is true of California which scores way higher in creative types than anything else along with much of the West. At last we finally have some peer reviewed scientific data that backs up what we suspected was true all along.


Sit in traffic on either side of the Hudson River and you’ll understand us.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

The Man Who Found The Titanic is Now Finding Much More

Most people have a rudimentary knowledge of the Titanic. 101 years ago the unsinkable RMS Titanic sunk off the coast of Canada after crashing into an iceberg on its maiden voyage. 85 years later James Cameron would make an incredibly successful and sappy movie about it and jump-started the acting career of Leonardo DiCaprio. Here’s something you probably didn’t know about the Titanic though. Prior to 1985, we didn’t know exactly where the ship sank and we had no idea what the Titanic looked like at the bottom of the ocean until the wreck was found by a man named Robert Ballard.

It turns out that finding the Titanic was only the tip of the iceberg for Ballard though. National Geographic has a great article on what he’s done since then and it is far cooler than just finding an old shipwreck. Since 1983 the national borders of the United States have included not just the 50 states and various islands like Puerto Rico and Guam, but all ocean 200 miles offshore (provided there’s not another country’s territorial waters in those 200 miles.) Robert Ballard’s mission is to try and map all of that underwater territory in detail. According to him when America’s land area doubled in 1803 with the Louisiana Purchase Thomas Jefferson sent Lewis and Clark out to explore and map it all. When America’s size doubled again in 1983, there was no accompanying exploration effort until Ballard took up that mission on his own.

Granted the practical use of this knowledge is irrelevant to many people’s lives but it is important to science. There is still much we don’t really know about the deepest depths of the ocean and this effort is an attempt to learn more about it and the creatures that live down there. Simply observing the ocean floor is notoriously difficult due to the extreme water pressure and in some ways it is easier to map outer space because there is nothing standing between our telescopes and the stars beyond. Still I find it fascinating that there are still parts of our country beneath the ocean waves that have yet to even be fully explored and that there is a real effort to change that.


That’s what the ocean floor looks like from far away. Ballard is filling in the details.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

An Interactive Map of Washington DC… In 1851

Our nation’s capital has an interesting past. When America won its independence from Britain, the city didn’t even exist. In fact the nation’s capital changed 13 different times between 1776 and 1800 moving between 9 separate cities. Why then did the country decide to create a brand new national capital on the Potomac River in 1800? Politics. In exchange for the federal government assuming the massive war debts racked up by the northern states in the Revolutionary War, they agreed to move the national capital south to a small piece of land between Maryland and Virginia.

Since officially becoming the official seat of America’s federal government it has gone through many trials and tribulations. The entire city was torched to the ground by British soldiers in the War of 1812 and the city was under martial law and constantly threatened during the Civil War. But through it all it rose up to become an awe-inspiring city with the majestic monuments and museums of the National Mall bringing in millions of people every year.

But what if I told you that when Abraham Lincoln was president the location where his memorial would eventually be built was underwater? That is one of the many cool things that you can find out with this interactive map of Washington DC. This map combines a satellite image of the city today with a map of the capital from 1851. It reveals some really cool things that I never knew about the city before. The Potomac River was much wider than it is today and about half of today’s National Mall used to be submerged. The place where RFK Stadium now stands was also similarly underwater. The street grid that the city followed then is almost completely unchanged from 1851. But perhaps my favorite thing that I found out from this map was that it called what we call the White House the “President’s House” which when you think about it seems like a much more sensible name for that building. It is definitely a cool little tool worth checking out.

national mall 1851

The Washington Monument used to be the end of the mall.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available throughout Washington D.C. and Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 for more information.

An Interactive Map of Manhattan… from 1836

New York City wasn’t always the metropolis it is now. For one thing the city limits of New York City used to be just Manhattan. It wasn’t until 1898 that the five boroughs joined together to become the city it is today. There was also far less people and it was much harder to get around. Getting from Brooklyn to Manhattan is now a common subway ride for most New Yorkers. That ride used to be a dangerous boat ride across the East River. If you could somehow teleport yourself to New York City 175 years ago you would probably have no idea where you were.

Now it is possible to be able to somewhat imagine what Manhattan was like back then thanks to this new interactive map from the Smithsonian. With this map they’ve combined a map of Manhattan from 1836 with a satellite image of the city today and you can see the differences. Back then you can still see the general patterns of the streets and avenues which largely remain the same today. However, there are huge amounts of empty space on the island and it gets emptier the further north you go. Even as far back as 1836 the area we call Harlem today was mostly just vacant land. In fact, it didn’t look like there was much in the way of development north of 42nd street. Seeing how comparatively undeveloped the city was back then makes you really appreciate how far it has come in so short a time. This map is a really cool glimpse into New York’s past and well worth checking out.

NYC 1836

Manhattan then and now.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York City and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

An Interactive Map of Brooklyn You’ve Never Seen Before

New York City’s architecture is a wonderful mix of young and old. The two most impressive buildings on the Manhattan skyline are the Empire State Building and the nearly complete World Trade Center One. Those buildings were constructed 82 years apart and looking at those two buildings side by side from a distance gives you a great sense of where we came from and where we are going. This mix of old and new doesn’t just apply to Manhattan skyscrapers either. Cross the East River and you will find a similar mix in the (shorter) buildings of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx all of which have buildings still standing since before 1825. Thomas Rhiel recently undertook an impressive project to visually illustrate this mix in Brooklyn. After going through the building records of more than 320,000 buildings he has put together a color-coded interactive map of Brooklyn with each building shaded depending on its age. This is a truly incredible project that reveals things that I never knew about Brooklyn in a very easily accessible way. It’s well worth checking out.


No sleep till Brooklyn!

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York City and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.