Posts Tagged 'interactive map'

Some Maps of How Educated America is

Here’s an interesting new interactive map to look through. The US Census Bureau has mapped the United States on a county by county basis based on education level. This is a map of every county in America sorted by high school graduation rate (a darker color indicates a higher percentage):

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.theatlantic.com/newsroom/img/posts/2013/12/Census_Explorer_HS/f901100d1.png

Here’s one for the percentage of adults with a bachelor’s degree (again, a darker color indicates a higher percentage):

https://i0.wp.com/cdn.theatlantic.com/newsroom/img/posts/2013/12/Census_Explorer_High_School/e53d48994.png

Here’s a better way to look at college graduates per county. in terms of raw numbers:

The message these maps show us is that it’s the Amtrak corridor (Washington DC, New York City, and Boston), the Great Lakes and California that really dominate the battle for the most educated areas of the country. I love it when people take raw boring statistical data and translate into something visually interesting to look at. This is just another interesting way to look at the various regions of America.

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A Real-Time Map of Wind on Earth

The wind is an incredibly interesting thing to think about. It is something that is completely invisible to us. We can hear, feel, smell, and even taste it but we can only see what it does to things that we can see. Ultimately it is just air in our atmosphere moving from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure and that is one of the most important parts of what makes weather possible on Earth.

I bring this up because I found an incredibly cool interactive globe last night that shows you the wind speeds everywhere on Earth in real-time. Looking at it zoomed out you’ll observe that the strongest winds at any given time will be over our oceans where there’s no land to get in the way. You have to zoom in pretty closely over the continents to actually see how fast the air is moving on land. It is a really fun tool to play around with and it gives you a good sense of what the weather might be like everywhere in the world at the moment.

https://i0.wp.com/www.juancole.com/images/2013/12/Screen-Shot-2013-12-19-at-5.21.04-PM-750x585.png

If you want to see something really cool, check out Antarctica.

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A Map of America’s Personality Types

It’s no secret that regional stereotypes about people exist in America. While there is some element of truth to stereotypes of all groups of people, it is hard to really scientifically quantify that. It is difficult to determine if New Yorkers really much ruder than the rest of the country of if Californians are really more laid back and creative. Well the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology just released a study covering all that and more. The primary goal of the study was to determine exactly the amount of regional variation in personality types America has.

Generally speaking the country was split among three different personality types: friendly and conventional, relaxed and creative, and temperamental and uninhibited and they released three maps showing the frequency of each personality type appearing in each state. The results are actually kind of what you would expect with few surprises. The state of New York scores very low in the frequency of friendly and conventional, while scoring extremely high in temperamental and uninhibited. The same is true of California which scores way higher in creative types than anything else along with much of the West. At last we finally have some peer reviewed scientific data that backs up what we suspected was true all along.


Sit in traffic on either side of the Hudson River and you’ll understand us.

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A Map All About Pizza

I wish I could go back in time to 17th century Naples and personally thank the unknown Italian who first came up with the idea of baking a flatbread crust with tomato and cheese on top. This staple of poor Neapolitans was introduced to America in 1905 in New York’s Little Italy and its popularity has exploded from there. Fast forward to today and there are now several pizza chains worth hundreds of millions of dollars all over the country competing against one another to offer the best pizza possible. Pizza has come a long way in America in 108 years.

Gizmodo has now quantified the spread of pizza in America with this cool new map. Specifically it will tell you where the closest pizza chain is in any 10 mile radius. The heaviest nationwide hitters are the ones you would probably expect like Pizza Hut, Domino’s, and Papa John’s but there are some very strong regional players as well. Even more interesting is that they actually have a chart comparing the distribution of one chain versus another which gives you a much clearer indication as to who has a stronger presence where. Also on a depressing note, there are large swaths of pizza deserts in sparsely populated areas in places like Montana, South Dakota, and Nevada where no chains have opened up shop. Of course this map excludes the presence of small independent pizza places which often produce a better tasting pizza than the chains (at least in New York and New Jersey) so this is not a comprehensive map of all areas where one can get pizza. While I may prefer my local, independently owned pizza shop in New Jersey, it is still really cool to see just how much the pizza business has come to blanket the country.


Apologies to Alaska and Hawaii.

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An Interactive Map of San Francisco… in 1859

Few people know this but the United States once had an emperor. Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico reigned from his seat of power in San Francisco between 1859 and 1880. In reality he was an English businessman who moved to California seeking fortune only to lose all of his money and kind of went crazy as a result. After declaring himself Emperor and publicly demanding the American government submit to his rule he became a local celebrity in San Francisco and was treated like royalty by most of the city though no one with any real power would actually listen to him. His lasting legacy was his repeated decrees that a bridge be built across San Francisco Bay. About 50 years after he died completely penniless the Golden Gate Bridge was built and today there is even a political effort to rename the bridge after Norton.

The Smithsonian has a great interactive map of San Francisco in 1859 when Norton began his reign compared to a satellite image of the city today. Back then it was the largest city in California but only about 56,000 people lived there which was tiny compared to the bigger cities back east. Most of what is now urban San Francisco was either wilderness or farmland back then. The other really shocking thing I found about that map was just how much people built over bodies of water. There was a creek that emptied out into a cove in the Bay back then but today that creek is underground and that cove is filled in completely. Looking back at these maps makes me marvel about just how quickly our cities got built up.

san fran
Norton’s imperial capital then and now.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

An Interactive Map of Chicago… in 1868

Chicago is now America’s third largest city and is by far the biggest metropolis in the middle of America. They’re well known for once having the world’s tallest building, deep dish pizza, a baseball team that hasn’t won the World Series in over a century, and changing their mayor about as often as the Pittsburgh Steelers change their head coach. It is also a very new city. 200 years ago it didn’t even exist and now it is home to 2.7 million people. Unlike places like New York or Boston you won’t find very many traces of Chicago’s early history from before the Civil War though. This is because just about the entire city burned to the ground in 1871 and the new buildings that were rebuilt bore little resemblance to the old ones. This is in part why Chicago was able to build the world’s first skyscraper in 1885. We do have a way of seeing what Chicago looked like before the fire though. Here is an interactive map of Chicago with a recent satellite image superimposed over an 1868 map of the city. As you can see the streets themselves were relatively unaffected by the fire and the grid pattern has largely stayed the same. The biggest difference that I can see is that the city has pushed out the shores of Lake Michigan. Most of the now famous Lakeshore Drive was underwater prior to the fire. I love maps like these because it is a great reminder of how far we’ve come over the years.

Chicago

Chicago before the Cubs could disappoint them.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available Nationwide. Please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com for more information.

An Interactive Map of Washington DC… In 1851

Our nation’s capital has an interesting past. When America won its independence from Britain, the city didn’t even exist. In fact the nation’s capital changed 13 different times between 1776 and 1800 moving between 9 separate cities. Why then did the country decide to create a brand new national capital on the Potomac River in 1800? Politics. In exchange for the federal government assuming the massive war debts racked up by the northern states in the Revolutionary War, they agreed to move the national capital south to a small piece of land between Maryland and Virginia.

Since officially becoming the official seat of America’s federal government it has gone through many trials and tribulations. The entire city was torched to the ground by British soldiers in the War of 1812 and the city was under martial law and constantly threatened during the Civil War. But through it all it rose up to become an awe-inspiring city with the majestic monuments and museums of the National Mall bringing in millions of people every year.

But what if I told you that when Abraham Lincoln was president the location where his memorial would eventually be built was underwater? That is one of the many cool things that you can find out with this interactive map of Washington DC. This map combines a satellite image of the city today with a map of the capital from 1851. It reveals some really cool things that I never knew about the city before. The Potomac River was much wider than it is today and about half of today’s National Mall used to be submerged. The place where RFK Stadium now stands was also similarly underwater. The street grid that the city followed then is almost completely unchanged from 1851. But perhaps my favorite thing that I found out from this map was that it called what we call the White House the “President’s House” which when you think about it seems like a much more sensible name for that building. It is definitely a cool little tool worth checking out.

national mall 1851

The Washington Monument used to be the end of the mall.

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An Interactive Map of Manhattan… from 1836

New York City wasn’t always the metropolis it is now. For one thing the city limits of New York City used to be just Manhattan. It wasn’t until 1898 that the five boroughs joined together to become the city it is today. There was also far less people and it was much harder to get around. Getting from Brooklyn to Manhattan is now a common subway ride for most New Yorkers. That ride used to be a dangerous boat ride across the East River. If you could somehow teleport yourself to New York City 175 years ago you would probably have no idea where you were.

Now it is possible to be able to somewhat imagine what Manhattan was like back then thanks to this new interactive map from the Smithsonian. With this map they’ve combined a map of Manhattan from 1836 with a satellite image of the city today and you can see the differences. Back then you can still see the general patterns of the streets and avenues which largely remain the same today. However, there are huge amounts of empty space on the island and it gets emptier the further north you go. Even as far back as 1836 the area we call Harlem today was mostly just vacant land. In fact, it didn’t look like there was much in the way of development north of 42nd street. Seeing how comparatively undeveloped the city was back then makes you really appreciate how far it has come in so short a time. This map is a really cool glimpse into New York’s past and well worth checking out.

NYC 1836

Manhattan then and now.

Churchill has short-term corporate housing available in New York City and Nationwide. For more information please contact us at 866-255-0593 or National@FurnishedHousing.com.

Where the President Travels

It used to be that presidents never traveled outside of our country. Getting elected to the Oval Office meant staying there during your term. International diplomatic travel was done by ambassadors and Secretaries of State. Part of it, especially for America, was that before the advent of airplanes it took a very long time to cross an ocean in a boat. Woodrow Wilson really was doing something unprecedented when he went over to Europe to negotiate the end of first world war as president. Now a grueling travel schedule is part of the job description of being president. Even just running for president requires jet-setting across America for years to campaign. Teddy Roosevelt stepped foot outside America only once as president. A century later, George W. Bush made a total of 140 diplomatic visits to 74 different countries during his presidency. Barack Obama is at 62 official visits to 43 different countries so far. The travel requirements for being president have certainly increased over the years. TIME has a great interactive map of what countries our presidents have visited and how often since 1900. Britain leads the pack for presidential visits with 58 followed by France, Canada, Mexico, and Germany. At least the president has a his own plane.

president map

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Where People Are (and Aren’t) Using the Internet

Let’s face it, if you’re reading this you have internet access. You are one of the 2.5 billion people on this planet that have reliable access to the internet and all the benefits that it brings. That also means you’re not part of the roughly 4.5 billion people who don’t have internet access. Well Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently announced that he’s going to try and change that. The ride of the internet and social media have allowed people to access unprecedented amounts of information, created entire new businesses and markets all over the world, and has even helped overthrow governments. Zuckerberg of course has a big financial interest in greater worldwide internet access. 4.5 billion more internet users means 4.5 billion more potential Facebook accounts and a potential rise in value of Facebook’s stagnant stock price.

In reaction to this news CNN Money made up an interesting interactive map showing which countries have the best and worst percentage of people with internet access. Iceland, Norway, and Sweden lead the world in internet access with 96%, 95%, and 94% connectivity rates while the three countries with the lowest percentages are Eritrea, East Timor, and Myanmar which have rates of 0.8%, 0.9%, and 1.1% respectively. One interesting revelation of this map is what it says about the United States. Only 81% of American households have internet access and I find that pretty astonishing since we’re the country that invented the internet in the first place. This would suggest that Facebook hasn’t quite run its base of potential subscribers completely dry in America despite many reports to the contrary.

internets

The darker the better.

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